Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Jewel # 206 (Feb. 17, 2015)

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“And they shall be Mine, saith the Lord
of hosts, in that day when I 
make up MY JEWELS.”
(Malachi 3:17)

To my dear grandchildren,

The Ways of the Beaver

“Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honour and power: for Thou hast created all things,
and for Thy pleasure they are and were created.”
(Revelation 4:11)

Once there were millions of beavers in streams, lakes and ponds throughout Canada and the United States, but to meet demands of fashion, trappers killed them mercilessly for their lovely fur, nearly wiping them out.  Fortunately, the fashion designers changed their designs so that beavers were spared to gradually rebuild their colonies.  Should you be visiting some of the mountain areas of the West or lakes in the North, you might get a glimpse of this fascinating creature.

Water is a prime necessity for the beaver, and God has provided it with adaptability to its wet surroundings.  A full-grown animal will be about 3 1/2 feet long, including a flat tail about five inches wide and a foot long.  This tail is most important; a beaver uses it, along with with its paws, to plaster its home and dams with mud.  Its tail is also a rudder for this excellent, web-footed swimmer and serves as a support while it stands on shore or gnaws on trees and shrubs.  When a beaver slaps that flat tail hard on the water’s surface, the sound is a warning for its companions to seek cover from an enemy coming too close for comfort.

This animal is a remarkable engineer, building watertight dams, some a half mile long, to form ponds.  It also builds a house or lodge as much as eight feet high and thirty feet in diameter.  Several beaver families may live in these lodges and have rooms for storing food for winter and other rooms for raising their young.  Here they are safe from their enemies, for their entrances and exits are all underwater, although the living quarters are always high and dry.

A beaver’s most prominent feature is its teeth, which are large, sharp and strong.  It uses them to cut down trees, which are then used in building dams, homes or for food.  Incidentally, their teeth never stop growing.  To keep them from getting hopelessly long, they must wear them down by gnawing.

The amazing skills of the beaver didn’t come about by trial and error.  God provided them with every feature and ability when He created them.

God puts a responsibility on all mankind to recognize His Son as the Creator of all things.  But more important yet, He has been made known to the world as the Saviour to those who trust in Him or as the Judge to those who refuse Him.  “He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him” (John 3:36).  How solemn  the warning,“Take heed . . . lest there be in any of you an evil heart of unbelief, departing from the living God” (Hebrews 3:12).

Love you all
Grandpa

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