Friday, July 21, 2017

Jewel # 291 (July 18, 2017)

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“And they shall be Mine, saith the Lord
of hosts, in that day when I make up MY JEWELS.”
(Malachi 3:17)

To my dear grandchildren

Robins are Popular

“Ask now . . . the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee about God’s creation.”
(Job 12:7)

To nearly everyone in North America the robin is a favourite bird.  It has become well - known for its cheery songs, one of which seems to say “cheer up, cheer up.”  And most of us have watched a robin, with its grayish-black head, back and tail, and its brick-red breast, hopping across a lawn.  It will stop frequently, cock its head sideways as if listening, and then quickly tug a nice fat worm out of the ground and swallow it.  

During summer months robins are found from Alaska and the Canadian Rockies, all the way across lower Canada and the United states, and down to the Gulf of Mexico.  In winter many migrate to the southern United States, and then in early spring they return to the exact spots they temporarily left behind—often to the very same nests.  The same male and female are usually paired together from year to year.

Building a nest requires lots of mud.  The female does most of the work, but her mate helps gather some of the material.  She starts by mixing mud and grass.  As the sides get higher and before the mud hardens, she squats down and squirms around to make a bowl-shaped bottom.  Then, after building the sides higher and before it fully hardens, she lines it with soft grasses, leaves and a few feathers.  Sometimes it takes two weeks to build a nest.  Then she lays from three to six pretty blue eggs.  

The eggs take about two weeks to hatch.  The chicks, naked and blind at birth, open their eyes in five days and feathers begin to show.  In only a few weeks, they are ready to fly.  Robins may have two or three broods during the spring and summer.  

Although most people admire these lively birds, they are at time a problem to fruit and berry growers.  Robins love to eat cherries and berries, along with their worm and insect diet.  But over all they are a great benefit to farmers and to all of us in eating a tremendous amount of harmful insects every day.  

These pretty birds were first called robins in colonial days.  People from England found their colours similar to the British robin.  Both are part of the thrush family.  

In looking at all kinds of birds, we are reminded that they are an important part of God’s creation.  We cannot help but marvel at the wide variety He placed on the earth, from the cold Arctic and Antarctic areas to the heat of the equator.  The Bible tells us He had real pleasure in creating them.

It is important to remember that the Bible also tells us, “Thou, even Thou, art Lord alone; Thou has made . . . the earth, and all things that are therein . . . and Thou preservest them all” (Nehemiah 9:6).  All creation belongs to Him.


Love you all - Grandpa      

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